Meeting Daniel Adair

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Blog post by L3 Audio Production student Ryan Davis.

Last year on the 7th of October 2012, I was given one of the best opportunities that I have had – I was able to personally interview Daniel Adair, who is most famously known for being the drummer of Nickelback. I obtained this interview for part of my dissertation, which is based on how drum technology has changed and how it has impacted drummers’ performance.

Gaining this interview was a great privilege. As a drummer, I was very happy to meet one of my idols and gained not only a great reliable source to use in my dissertation, but also a professional drummer’s view on my chosen subject.

Obtaining this interview was never an easy task as it involved many phone calls and a lot sweet-talking, including speaking to Nickelback’s Personal Manger. However, in doing so I managed to secure an incredible interview from Daniel Adair and also made contacts throughout the lengthy process, which will help me further my career once I have left university.

It just goes to show how persistence and being well mannered and polite can get you a long way. When I first started at University, I never thought it would have been possible to to interview not only one of my idols, but also to gain a great insight for use in my dissertation.

David Bowie – “Where are we now”

NEW RELEASE FROM DAVID BOWIE

In a remarkable low key way, on his 66th birthday, David Bowie has released a song taken from a new album (to be released in March 2013) to be called ‘The Next Day’

On iso/Columbia Records, available on iTunes in 119 Countries simultaneously
He also has relaunched his website www.davidbowie.com

The Next Day will be his 30th Studio Album

No interviews or statements were forthcoming from Bowie, though Tony Visconti has said that Bowie is happy and healthy, and has been spending the last two years making this album.

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The Guardian today states:

A spokesman added that Bowie was the sort of artist who “writes and performs what he wants when he wants”.A second representative subsequently told the Guardian there were no plans for interviews or live dates.

 

 

His first release for about a decade, new audio work by Bowie is rare these days following his withdrawal from performing due to a heart condition.
Bowie is a major figure in the development of music in the late 20th Century and is renowned for constantly re-inventing himself, and always surprising people.

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Here’s how BBC Radio Four  announced it on air

Produced by long term collaborator Tony Visconti, ‘Where Are We Now?’ was written by David Bowie, and was recorded in New York.

 

This unusual video was directed by Tony Oursler and harks back to David’s time in Berlin. Apparently he appears with Bjork (a friend) projected onto dummy heads.

He is seen looking in on footage of the auto repair shop beneath the apartment he lived in along with stark images of the city at the time and a lyric constantly raising the question “Where Are We Now?”

you can also see the video on Bowie’s newly changed website here

 

Here is an interview with Tony Visconti on BBC News http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/entertainment-arts-20953094

INDEPENDENT 8/1/2013

Unsurprisingly, 10 years since he was last heard, Bowie’s voice sounds older and more world-weary. The melancholic song sees him reviewing his time in Berlin – where he created some of his most groundbreaking music in the 1970s – as he lists some of his haunts with the repeated line “just walking the dead”.

And in the video directed by Tony Oursler, with the musician’s pensive face projected on to a puppet, he appears to be almost biting back tears as he looks back on his life.

Where Are We Now? was written by Bowie and recorded in New York. It was produced by long-term collaborator Tony Visconti, who has worked on many of his most famous albums, beginning with 1969’s Space Oddity.

A follow-up album called The Next Day is set to be released in March.

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If Chimes Could Whisper – The Strange Tale of the Glass Armonica

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Dame Evelyn Glennie celebrates the 250th birthday of one of the most unusual of all musical instruments, the Glass Armonica, premiered by Benjamin Franklin in 1762. She tries out the working instrument at the Benjamin Franklin House in London, sees an original example in the Horniman Museum, and discovers the repertoire written for it by Mozart, Hasse and Donizetti. On the way, she encounters madness and mental illness, reveals one of the world’s first female virtuosi, Marianne Davies, and meets the man responsible for the present day revival of this remarkable instrument, Thomas Bloch.

Listen to the BBC Radio 3 programme here

50 Years Of The Cassette

Neneh Cherry looks at the role of the cassette in music history including the role of the tape in hip hop in the 80s.

In the 80s Britain was a nation in love with the cassette. At its peak we bought 83 million and the cassette became more popular than vinyl. Then came the runaway success of digital music with formats such as the iPod and the MP3 player and the eject button was pressed on sales of the cassette.

6 Music Celebrates: 50 Years of the Cassette with an hour’s show looking back at the format’s role in music from the early days of hip hop, through the legendary NME C86 Indie compilation tape, the 80s slogan “Home Taping is Killing Music”, to compilations, mixtapes and fond memories of the cassette.

The programme features contributions from artists including Grandmaster Flash, DJ Shadow, The Black Keys, Kings of Leon, The Kills, Friends, Django Django, The Shins, Mike Skinner, Beach House, Foals, The Cribs, The Pastels, The Manics, Mike Smith, David Toop, Neneh Cherry and a tiny label called the Tapeworm, who still produce cassette-only releases

Listen to the 6 Music programme here